About Curling

Rules of Etiquette

Curling has a long tradition of being played with Sportsmanship, Courtesy, Respect and Honor.  The moment you step on to the ice, it is your responsibility to live up to these traditions, so in addition to “Rules of the Game” these are some Rules of Etiquette which every conscientious curler should observe.

 

1.      Don't be late. When you are late you are holding up the seven other curlers playing in the game. If you will be late for an unavoidable reason, let your skip know as soon as possible so he or she can take appropriate action.

2.      Get a sub. There may be occasion when you're not able to curl as scheduled and it is your responsibility to get a substitute. Call your skip and give the name of the curler substituting for you or the names of people you have called.

3.      Call your opponent.  When you are the skip and your team is unable to play in a scheduled event, contact the umpire or skip of the opposing team as soon as possible.

4.      Practice on a different sheet. If you arrive early and want to throw a few stones to practice or warm up, by all means do so but do not use the sheet you'll be playing on.

5.      Respect the ice.  Be sure to clean your shoes before stepping on to the ice.  Do not rest your hands or knees on the ice.  Clean your brush/broom before and during the game.  It is everyone's responsibility to keep the sheet of ice clean.

6.      Start with a handshake.  As soon as you arrive on the ice where you are going to play, greet each member of the opposing team with a handshake, introduce yourself, and wish them “good curling.”

7.      Do not distract your opponent. This includes being out of position, crossing the ice surface while he/she is in the hack, getting in the way of the sweepers, or causing a distraction of any kind.

8.      Know your position.  Sweepers on the delivering team should be on the sidelines inside the hogline.  Skips on the non-delivering team should be behind the house in a stationary position with his/her broom off the ice, preferably behind the opposing skip.  Sweepers on the non-delivering team should be in single file at the sidelines and between the two courtesy lines.  The opposition thrower should be behind the backboard and to the side of the ice, standing quietly.

9.      Do not distract other games.  Never stand or walk on a sheet other than the one on which you are playing.

10.  Be ready to deliver your stone.  Take your position in the hack as soon as your opponent has delivered his stone.

11.  Be ready to sweep.  Don’t be in the position of having to run from one hog line to the other before you can start sweeping.

12.  Keep alert and pay attention.  Watch your opponents’ shots as well as your teammates, you may learn something!

13.  Place your skip’s rock in front of the hack.  This helps speed up the game.

14.  Watch for errant stones.  Do not let stones run into or over the hacks, hit the back board at high speed or cross onto adjacent sheets. Equipment may be damaged or players injured by rebounding stones.

15.  Applaud good shots.  Be quick to compliment a good shot by either side.  Never pass an adverse remark about a poor shot or smile at an opponent’s misfortune.

16.  Wait for the score. Vice skips are the only players allowed in the house while the score for the end is being decided.  Do not move any stones in the house until a score is settled.

17.  Know when it's over. Unlike other sports, there is no negative connotation associated with conceding a game when a team feels it is impossible or near impossible to win. This may occur at any point during the game, but normally near the final end.  It is not required to concede and teams may play until the last stone but consider resigning early if a game is clearly lopsided, especially if either team has more games to play.

18.  End with a handshake.  At the end of the game, whether you win or lose, give each of your opponents a handshake, thank them for the game and arrange to meet them for broomstacking.  The winning curlers traditionally offer their counterparts some refreshment and in turn, their opponents normally reciprocate.

 

Mayfield Curling Club, South Euclid, OH
webmaster at mayfieldcurling dot com